First Published: 2009-09-14

 
Bin Laden: US support for Israel prompted 9/11
 

Al-Qaeda leader cites known facts, genuine Muslim grievances to regain fading support.

 

Middle East Online

Stating the obvious in bid to seek lost Muslim support

WASHINGTON - Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden told Americans in a new message Sunday that their support for Israel had the launch of the September 11, 2001 attacks, a US-based terror monitoring group said.

Al-Qaeda's As-Sahab media released a video titled "Message to the American People," which features a still image of bin Laden and an audio statement, said IntelCenter.

According to the center, Bin Laden said that among "some other injustices," US support to Israel motivated Al-Qaeda to launch the 9/11 attacks.

He also stated that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were driven by the pro-Israeli lobby in the White House and corporate interests, not Muslim militants.

"If you think about your situation well, you will know that the White House is occupied by pressure groups," he said, according to IntelCenter. "Rather than fighting to liberate Iraq - as Bush claimed - it (the White House) should have been liberated."

He was referring to former US president George W. Bush, who launched an invasion of Iraq in 2003.

According to bin Laden, current US President Barack Obama is powerless to change the course of the wars.

Obama's retention of US Defense Secretary Robert Gates and other individuals from the Bush administration is confirmation of the president's weakness, the Al-Qaeda chief argued.

Bin Laden urges Americans to pressure White House leaders to cease the wars and US support to Israel, rather than succumb to "the ideological terrorism" exercised by neo-conservatives.

"The bitter truth is that the neo-conservatives continue to cast their heavy shadows upon you," he said.

If the wars are not ended, "all we will do is to continue the war of attrition against you on all possible axes, like we exhausted the Soviet Union for ten years until it collapsed with grace from God the Almighty and became a memory of the past," bin Laden vowed.

Observers say Bin Laden cited known facts and genuine Muslim grievances to regain fading support for his group.

The Al-Qaeda leader, they add, has only sated the obvious to show that he is still sensitive to issues important to Muslims amid wide Arab and Islamic public displeasure of his violent methods.

His message, which analysts say is really directed at the Muslim world and not the American people as he said, will likely to fail in gaining any sympathy or support, as the Muslim peoples are not interested in his contribution to their just causes.

The release came two days after the United States marked the eighth anniversary of the Al-Qaeda-sponsored attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 people.

IntelCenter said bin Laden typically releases such a statement annually around September or October.

The last audiotape by bin Laden was released June 3. In that missive he scorned Obama's overture to the Muslim world and warned of decades of conflict ahead.

Bin Laden has a 50-million-dollar bounty on his head and has been in hiding for the past eight years.

US intelligence officials say they believe the world's most wanted man is hiding in either Pakistan or Afghanistan near the remote mountainous border between the two countries.

 

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