First Published: 2012-11-06

 

Sudan in state of denial: There is no crisis in South Kordofan

 

Khartoum insists no humanitarian crisis in war-torn South Kordofan as international plan to get aid into area expires without any food reaching hungry.

 

Middle East Online

More than 900,000 people severely affected

KHARTOUM - There is no humanitarian crisis in war-torn South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, Sudan said on Tuesday as an international plan to get aid into the area expired without any food reaching the hungry.

Despite months of talks about how to get assistance into rebel-held areas of the two border states, where fighting began more than a year ago, the number of people affected by the war has continued to increase.

More than 240,000 have now sought refuge in neighbouring South Sudan and Ethiopia, the UN said last Friday.

Including the refugees, more than 900,000 people are estimated to be displaced or severely affected, the UN has said, noting reports of serious food shortages and lack of adequate health care in rebel-held areas.

"There is no humanitarian crisis in South Kordofan and Blue Nile but there is a humanitarian need and it has to be taken care of, especially in the health sector and drinking water," Sudan's top aid official, Sulaiman Abdul Rahman, told reporters on Tuesday.

He confirmed the expiry of a memorandum, reached with the UN, Arab League and African Union, which was supposed to allow for aid delivery throughout the warzone, including to rebel-held areas.

The three organisations issued their so-called Tripartite proposal in February as international concern mounted over malnutrition and food shortages in the two states.

Khartoum had cited security worries in tightly restricting the operations of foreign aid agencies.

The rebel Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) agreed to the Tripartite plan in February, followed by Khartoum in June.

Memoranda to implement the deals were not signed separately with the government and rebels until August 4 and 5.

The memoranda were valid for 90 days and called for ceasefire zones that would allow the aid to flow.

But the agreements were never implemented.

In one of its most strongly worded statements on the situation in the two states bordering South Sudan, the UN's Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said last month the Tripartite deal still awaited a "green light."

It said the UN, AU and Arab League presented various detailed plans but "neither the government nor the SPLM-N have yet formally agreed on a concrete plan of action for assessment and delivery of aid."

Rahman blamed Sudan's Tripartite partners for the delay but put "full responsibility" on the rebels.

The insurgents, in turn, said government delays were to blame.

 

Air strikes kill 150 militants fleeing Fallujah

UN envoy seeks Syria peace talks’ resumption in July

41 killed in Istanbul airport bomb, gun attacks

EU agrees to opens new chapter with Turkey on accession talks

Egypt becoming departure country for migrants to Europe

UN extends Darfur mission despite Sudan opposition

Turkey detains 13 over airport attack

Palestinian killed by Israeli troops after deadly attack

Tunisian killed in Istanbul attack seeking to repatriate IS-linked son

Turkish forces kill 2 suspected IS jihadists at Syria border

Egypt president urges religious reforms to counter extremists

First aid convoy since 2012 enters two besieged Syria towns

Race to succeed Cameron begins after stunning Brexit vote

Yemen peace talks to take two-week break

Iraq secures $2.7 billion US military loan

ISIS pushes back Syria rebel offensive on Iraq route

Israel cabinet approves Turkey reconciliation deal

Turkey airport attack slams limping tourism industry

Putin lifts Turkey travel restrictions, orders trade 'normalised'

Fears for stranded Syrian refugees as Jordan blocks access

Bahrain activist back in jail despite worsening health

Witnesses recount Istanbul attack

Car bomb kills 10 in Kurdish-held Syria town

Ban to Israeli PM: Gaza blockade ‘collective punishment’

Alstom-led consortium awarded $2.88 billion Dubai metro extension

Democratic hopes fade away in Egypt

US-backed Syria rebels advance on key IS link to Iraq

Israel revokes controversial 'Hannibal Directive'

Detained Bahraini activist hospitalised

UN chief urges Netanyahu to make tough choices

Saudi Aramco, SABIC in joint petrochemicals study

Yemen clashes, air strikes kill 37 civilians

Egypt's anti-graft tsar becomes public enemy number one

Iraqis shun return to 'cursed' Fallujah

Lebanese army raids refugee camps after bombings

Ankara goes back on compensation offer for downed Russia jet

Iraq court deals blow to PM's cabinet reform efforts

UAE jails Emirati woman for spying for Hezbollah

Eight hurt in Turkey car bombing blamed on PKK

Iran hopes Saudi embassy attack trial will restore confidence

France charges Assad's uncle with graft

EgyptAir black box flight recorder 'repaired'

11 Kurdish rebels, 3 Revolutionary Guards killed in Iran

Egypt deports British-Lebanese TV show host

Turkey seeks to restore broken ties with Russia