Election of new Head of Cairo's Journalists Syndicate in setback for Muslim Brotherhood

Journalists again: Bread, freedom, social justice

CAIRO - Egyptian journalists have elected Head of the Ahram Center for Political and Strategic Studies (ACPSS) Diaa Rashwan as the new head of Cairo's Journalists Syndicate on Friday.
Rashwan garnered 1280 votes to 1015 for challenger Abdel Mohsen Salama. The elections were held in the Journalists Syndicate in Cairo and its branch in Alexandria on Friday.
“The syndicate stood against repression,” Rashwan said after the votes were counted. “And oppressive regimes have fallen while the syndicate is still here.”
The frontrunners for the title were Salama, the writer and managing editor of Al-Ahram Arabic daily newspaper, and Diaa Rashwan, the famous political analyst and head of ACPSS.
Born in 1960, political analyst Diaa Rashwan is known for his political studies and analysis on Islamist groups in Egypt and the Arab world. A graduate of faculty of economics and political sciences at Cairo University, Rashwan joined ACPSS in 1981; in 2011, he was appointed as head of the centre.
Diaa Rashwan ran for the Journalists Syndicate head position in 2009, but failed. He also ran for the parliamentary elections in 2010, but was not elected.
Rashwan is the second head of Journalists Syndicate to be chosen after Egypt's 25 January Revolution. In 2011, Egyptian journalists elected Mamdouh El-Wali as the head of the syndicate.
After being postponed for two weeks for failing to reach quorum, elections for the head of the press syndicate and six of the 12 board members were held among hopes that the next board would distance itself from political bias which caused the failure of outgoing syndicate head Mamdouh El-Wali, known for his affiliation to the Muslim Brotherhood.
The six board members elected are Karem Mahmoud of the privately-owned Tahrir daily, Alaa Thabet, formerly associated with one of Al-Ahram's publications, Osama Dawoud of the Nasserite Al-Araby newspaper, Gamal Abdel Rehim of the state-run Al-Gomhurriya newspaper, Hanan Fekry of the Coptic Watany newspaper and Khaled al-Balshy of the leftist-leaning Al-Bedaya website.