Turkey’s Elected Dictator
For Erdogan, being elected was akin to being granted a license to trample and dismantle all democratic tenets to consolidate his powers and promote his Islamic agenda, stresses Alon Ben-Meir.
What Should we Take Away from Turkey’s Almost-Coup?
Erdogan’s minister of Labor Suleyman Soylu openly accused Washington of being behind the coup attempt. Some think he represents the thinking of Erdogan himself, to whom he is close. It is extraordinary that high cabinet official of a NATO member state should launch such charges publicly against the United States, writes Juan Cole.
Why Turkey’s Coup Failed
The failed coup attempt challenged Erdogan’s grip on power. Will he now grasp it more tightly or pivot towards some reform? Asks Deniz Aribogan.
Turkey’s Faltering Democracy
Turkish President Erdogan crushed a military coup this weekend but this victory for civilian rule will do little to revive Turkish democracy which Erdogan has been strangling with his autocratic grip on power, notes ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.
Uncontrolled Refugeeism Lacks Political Wisdom
The present refugee situation in Europe, accentuated by the reality of terrorism, brings to the surface the undercurrents of the immigrant-refugee problem which has been simmering for two generations, and has now reached the boiling point, argues Ben Tanosborn.
When Is the Moment to Ask for More Effective Anti-Terror Policy?
With every new attack, it becomes more and more clear that the world is dealing — or not dealing, actually — with three dimensions of this now routine phenomenon of mass killings of innocent civilians, notes Rami G. Khouri.
Painful time for Turkey economy after attempted coup

Economists say sharply lower economic performance including recession is not inevitable.

IMF to Turkey: Democracy is crucial to economic stability
Algeria, Indonesia group to invest $4.5 billion in phosphate mining
Turkey moves to quell market concerns over political instability
Hapag-Lloyd, United Arab Shipping to merge
Oil prices fall on resurgent supply glut worries
Kuwait sets minimum wage for domestic staff
Saudi Arabia resumes US beef imports after mad cow scare
IEA sees oil stabilising on higher 2016 demand
Iraq marshlands named UNESCO world heritage site

Area named is made up of seven sites: three archaeological sites and four wetland marsh areas in southern Iraq.

Muhammad Ali's family prepares funeral
Cannes spotlight on Iranian cinema
Palestinian museum to open without exhibition
Peshmerga documentary makes late entry in Cannes
Egypt's turmoil comes to Cannes in a police van
Turkish satire tackles adoption at Cannes
Rabai al-Madhoun wins International Prize for Arabic Fiction
SZBA Annual Book Award ceremony to be held Sunday
 
In Saudi, Pokemon Go game is ‘un-Islamic’
Kingdom's Permanent Committee for Scholarly Research and Ifta has republished 2001 edict on the augmented-reality game after "receiving many questions" on it from public.
HIV infections level off at 'worrying' rate
New report paints ‘worrying picture of slow progress in reducing new HIV infections.’
‘Crisis' in Lebanon for Syria refugee children out of school
Problem is particularly acute among children aged 15-18, just 3% of whom were enrolled in public schools during current school year.
AIDS summit opens with warnings that gains at risk
Conference is seen as key gathering of experts tackling pandemic that has claimed more than 30 million lives in 35 years.
Iraq marshlands named UNESCO world heritage site
Area named is made up of seven sites: three archaeological sites and four wetland marsh areas in southern Iraq.
Iran denies banning sculptor from leaving country
Police deny claims by Parviz Tanavoli they are behind legal complaint that has prevented artist from leaving country.
Nice attack new blow to French tourism
Deadly truck attack against jewel of French Riviera, which is number two destination in France behind Paris, is new strike against country’s tourism.
Stranded at South Sudan's border
Recent spike in fighting in South Sudan means few truck drivers are willing or able to make the 200 kilometre journey from Nimule to Juba.
Stranded at South Sudan's border
Recent spike in fighting in South Sudan means few truck drivers are willing or able to make the 200 kilometre journey from Nimule to Juba.
Sexual transmission of AIDS on rise in Iran
Majority of AIDS transmissions in Iran continue to be through syringes shared among drug addicts.
Old bones shed new light on giant Goliath's people
Cemetery’s discovery marks ‘crowning achievement’ of some three decades of excavations.
Iran bids farewell to late director Abbas Kiarostami
Several thousand cinema lovers join top artists in Tehran to bid farewell to Abbas Kiarostami following his death last week in Paris.