First Published: 2008-02-14

 
China ‘regrets’ Spielberg pullout over Darfur
 

Beijing strikes back at US film-maker’s criticism over Sudan, asks not to bring politics into Olympics.

 

Middle East Online

Liu Jianchao: we cannot accept political objectives

BEIJING - China expressed regret Thursday over US film-maker Steven Spielberg's decision to cut ties with the Beijing Olympics, saying it was unacceptable to link politics to the sporting extravaganza.

Responding to what has become a public relations disaster ahead of the Games, authorities also defended China's involvement with Sudan, which led to Spielberg pulling out as an artistic adviser over the Darfur crisis.

"We feel regret about his remarks," foreign ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao said, after Spielberg called on Tuesday for China to do more to urge the Sudanese government to resolve the problems in Darfur.

"Some people are attempting to link the Darfur issue with Chinese government policies in Sudan, even with the organisation of the Olympics," he said without mentioning the US producer by name.

"If they don't know the Chinese policy, I can understand. But if they have got some objectives, especially political objectives, we cannot accept that."

Spielberg's statement coincided with criticism from Nobel Prize winners and Olympic athletes of Beijing's record on Darfur who addressed a letter on the same day to Chinese President Hu Jintao.

Signatories to the letter included South Africa's Archbishop Desmond Tutu and other Nobel Peace laureates as well as Olympic athletes, writers, actors and political figures from around the world.

"As the primary economic, military and political partner of the government of Sudan, and as a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, China has both the opportunity and the responsibility to contribute to a just peace in Darfur," said the letter.

"Ongoing failure to rise to this responsibility amounts, in our view, to support for a government that continues to carry out atrocities against its own people."

The United Nations estimates 200,000 people have died in Darfur from the combined effects of war, famine and disease since 2003, when rebels began a conflict against the Khartoum government.

China is a major economic partner and supplier of arms to Sudan, which is in turn accused of backing militia forces responsible for much of the violence.

Beijing consistently responds to attacks on its record in Sudan by defending its support for the government and accusing its attackers of prejudice against China, and it do so again on Thursday.

"The Chinese government has made unremitting efforts to resolve the Darfur issue," said Zhu Jing, a spokeswoman from the Olympic organising committee.

"Linking the Darfur issue to the Olympic Games will not help to resolve this issue and is not in line with the Olympic spirit that separates sports from politics."

Meanwhile, Sudan's Olympic Committee also expressed over Spielberg’s pulled out.

"We have always been against politics creeping into sport and we have never mixed the two," committee head and retired general Salah Mohammed Saleh said.

"Nothing harms the sporting spirit more than politics," he said, adding that the Sudanese Olympic Committee stands "above any political interference".

"This is the only activity in Sudan completely free of any political interference and the only activity that unites all Sudanese," he added.

"We are not paying much attention to Spielberg. We have strategic relations with Chinese sports bodies and our athletes are going ahead with preparations for the Olympic Games," said Saleh.

 

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