First Published: 2010-02-19

 
A Scientifically Validated Security Strategy for the Middle East
 

Militaries are responsible for defending their citizens. They can now succeed in this mission simply by creating a Prevention Wing - a group of Invincible Defence Technology experts, note Maj Gen (Ret) Kulwant Singh and Dr David Leffler.

 

Middle East Online

A new technology of defense is now available that has been scientifically shown to prevent war and create peace by harnessing the deepest level of nature's functioning.

War is ultimately a human problem requiring a human solution. Experts in the field of conflict resolution maintain that the underlying cause of war is accumulated "social stress" - i.e., mounting political, religious and/or ethnic tensions between rival factions in critical hotspots throughout the world. As social stress builds, divisions grow stronger, groups take sides, diplomats become unable to resolve differences, and enemies arise within or outside the nation. Military force may then be invoked to protect the country, resulting in armed conflict and unpredictable outcomes. But even if conflict temporarily solves the problem for the victor, the social stress remains, fueling future cycles of conflict. In contrast, the absence of collective stress translates into the absence of tension between competing sides, thereby reducing the probability of hostilities.

Today, the militaries of the Middle East have an opportunity to overcome the cycle of war by deploying a scientifically verified technology of defense that neutralizes social stress. This new technology is based on the unified field of all the laws of nature - the most fundamental and powerful level of nature's functioning. The technology accesses and enlivens this unified field through subjective technologies of consciousness, thereby creating a profound influence of coherence and harmony throughout society that results in measurable reductions of crime, terrorism, and war.

The late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi revived systematic subjective technologies for experiencing the unified field, including the Transcendental Meditation program and its advanced techniques. When used in a military context these meditation practices are known as Invincible Defence Technology (IDT). They have been successfully applied by members of many faiths to eliminate conflict. If any military in the Middle East region were to properly apply these non-lethal and non-destructive technologies, it could reduce collective societal stress and resulting conflict.

Over 50 research studies confirm that when the required threshold of IDT experts is crossed - approximately the square root of 1% of a given population - crime goes down, quality of life indices go up, and war and terrorism abate. Scientists have named this phenomenon the Maharishi Effect, since Maharishi Mahesh Yogi first predicted it. The causal mechanism appears to be a field effect of consciousness - a spillover effect on the level of the unified field from the peace-creating group into the larger population.

In 1983, a two-month Maharishi Effect intervention in Israel resulted in a 76% reduction in war deaths in neighboring Lebanon (p < 10-7) when group size exceeded the square root of 1% threshold (Journal of Conflict Resolution). Seven subsequent, consecutive experiments over a two-year period during the peak of the Lebanon war found

war-related fatalities decreased by 71% (p < 10-10)

war-related injuries fell by 68% (p < 10-6)

the level of conflict dropped by 48% (p < 10-8)

cooperation among antagonists increased by 66% (p < 10-6)

The likelihood that these combined results were due to chance is less than one part in 1019) (Journal of Social Behavior and Personality). A global-scale study published in the Journal of Offender Rehabilitation documented a 72% drop in international terrorism.

Militaries are responsible for defending their citizens. They can now succeed in this mission simply by creating a Prevention Wing - a group of IDT experts. The size of the Prevention Wing would be small - approximately the square root of 1% of the population of the country. To protect the population of the entire Middle East region, approximately 1,717 soldiers would be needed.

As part of its responsibility to protect the nation, the military is obligated to thoroughly examine scientifically proven methods for preventing war and terrorism. With the IDT approach, all that is necessary is to provide the proper training for groups of military personnel - or indeed, any sizable group within the nation. Any military has the opportunity today through IDT to create national security, invincibility, and peace. But the time to act is now.

About the Authors:

Major General (Ret) Kulwant Singh, UYSM., PhD, leads an international group of generals and defense experts that advocates Invincible Defense Technology. He was awarded the Uttam Yudh Sewa Medal, the second highest decoration for senior officers during operations in Sri Lanka as part of IPKF (Indian Peace Keeping Force).

David Leffler, PhD, a US Air Force veteran, is Executive Director of the Center for Advanced Military Science (CAMS). http://www.StrongMilitary.org Dr Leffler served as an Associate of the Proteus Management Group at the Center for Strategic Leadership, US Army War College.

 

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