First Published: 2003-08-28

 
Watch out for Kufa Cola
 

Homegrown Iraqi cola battling tough post-war competition, determined to win.

 

Middle East Online

By Selim Saheb Ettaba - KUFA, Iraq

The Cola war

Launched six months before the war, homegrown Kufa Cola, is facing stiff competition in a market inundated with better-known soft-drink brands since coalition forces invaded the country in March.

Named after the Iraqi holy city of Kufa and owned by one of the country's wealthiest Shiite Muslim families, however, Kufa is determined to win the popularity war.

Packaged exclusively in cans, which are more heat-resistant but dearer than the bottles used by rivals, the war drastically curtailed Kufa output.

"We produced more than 350,000 cases (each containing 24 cans) before the war and we stored them," says Raid Najjah Kubba, at 26, general manager of the drinks factory of 150 workers.

"At the start of the war, the American army used our factory as a base for its operations. They stayed for more than two weeks and took 7,000 cases from storage, as well as our trucks.

"We filed a compensation claim asking for more than 250,000 dollars," he adds.

But, although there has been no reimbursement from the US military, the businessman is delighted to have them as customers.

"They like it so much. We sell them more than 100 cases a week, especially the orange," he says.

Initial hopes for a partnership deal with Pepsi Cola -- the only cola producer allowed in Iraq after Arabs boycotted Coca Cola in the mid-1960s for building a factory in Israel -- collapsed in the wake of UN sanctions imposed following Iraq's 1990 invasion of Kuwait.

But since Kubba took over in 1998 and the product was named Kufa, after the city where the first Shiite imam, Ali established his capital before being killed in 661, it has towed a firmly Iraqi line.

"We took the name Kufa because we are close to Kufa and we belong to this city," said Kubba. His uncle, chairman of the family empire, which includes a bank, clothes shop and agriculture industry, was born here.

He insists that the name was not chosen to exploit the anti-American boycott, like Zam-Zam Cola in Iran, or more recently, Mecca Cola.

As well as cola, the factory produces Kufa orange, Kufa seven up, Kufa soda and diet drinks.

The liquid concentrate comes from Lebanon, the cans from Jordan and the water from the nearby Euphrates river, Kubba says.

"We sell more than 10,000 cases per day," he says, adding that it's impossible to keep up with nationwide demand.

But, while the red Kufa cans are on widely seen in Iraq's central cities of Najaf, Kufa and Karbala, they face stiff competition in the capital.

An influx of imported colas has flooded into the country since the UN Security Council lifted 13 years of economic sanctions and the US-led coalition scrapped tariffs on most goods until the end of the year to boost the shattered economy.

"Not many people buy them, because they are more expensive than the bottles," says Karim Hashim, 40, who sells drinks in Sadr City, Baghdad's Shiite quarter named after the late Ayatollah Mohammed Baqer al-Sadr.

"The best is Saudi Pepsi because it's very strong," says 27-year-old Riad Najim Abdullah, in the neighbouring Shiite quarter of Jamila.

Kufa brand recognition has a long way to go in the capital.

"I didn't know that it was an Iraqi product," admits Abdullah.

But Khalid Odat, a 31-year-old grocer in Jamila, predicts a rosy future for Kufa.

"It's popular here thanks to its sacred name, like Sadr and because it tastes stronger," he said, a portrait of Ayatollah Sadr hanging on the wall behind him.

Not to mention that it benefits from one essential asset as an Iraqi product: "It lasts a long time in the sun."

 

Turkey detains top generals, prominent journalists in widening purge

Russia ‘far from US positions’ on Syria

Libya demands explanation over presence of French troops

Arab summit in Mauritania cut to single day

Cheers in Abu Dhabi as solar plane completes round-the-world trip

Bahrain refers 138 ‘terror’ suspects to court

Brutal attacks reignite political friction in Germany

Weakened army still faces twin challenges in Turkey

Hamas 'summer camp' trains dozens of young people for war

Palestinians seek to sue Britain over 1917 Balfour Declaration

UN hopes Syria peace talks can resume late August

Israeli authorities destroy 11 Palestinian homes in Jerusalem

ISIS claims attack on French church in Normandy

Erdogan accuses EU of not paying up under migrant deal

Study: Height down in some MENA countries

Iran denies presence of three Al-Qaeda operatives

Iran caps salaries in bid to end scandal

Kerry says US-Russia talks on Syria 'making progress'

Erdogan to visit Russia on August 9

More than 3,000 lost in Mediterranean in 2016

13 killed in Somalia suicide bomb attacks

Panama Papers reveal Italian bribes' paid to Algerian officials

Syria regime advances on rebels in Aleppo

Turkey detains veteran female reporter

ISIS claims second German attack in a week

France calls for immediate humanitarian truce in Aleppo

Dozens dead in 5 days of Yemen fighting

Israel advances plans for 770 settlement homes

Libya conflict keeps 279,000 children out of school

After week of attacks, Germany warns of backlash against refugees

Iraqi charged with having 'trace' explosives in Poland

UN Syria envoy, US, Russian officials to hold talks Tuesday

Kuwait top court acquits IOC powerbroker Sheikh Ahmad

Air strikes, rebel fire kill 19 in Aleppo

12 killed in suicide bomb attack north of Baghdad

Egypt policeman killed in Sinai attack claimed by IS

Turkey cracks down on journalists after coup

Syrian migrant blows self up near German music festival

ISIS suicide bomber kills at least 15 in northern Baghdad

Turkey readies first cross-party rally to condemn coup

Libya loyalists seize ISIS bomb factory in Sirte

Tunisia dissident, Mohsen Marzouk, opens new party congress

Air raids jeopardise much-needed medical care in Aleppo

Saudi delegation in Israel to promote stalled peace initiative

At least 61 people dead as ISIS claims twin blasts in Kabul