First Published: 2004-03-01

 
Outline of Iraq's new temporary constitution
 

 

Middle East Online

BAGHDAD - Iraq's temporary constitution will take effect from July 1 and last until a permanent charter is drawn up by a new parliament to be directly elected by the people before the end of January 2005, officials said.

The US-picked interim Governing Council will hold an official signing ceremony on Wednesday after the Ashura Shiite Muslim holiday. US overseer in Iraq Paul Bremer is then due to rubber-stamp the "Fundamental Law".

Comprising some 64 articles split into nine chapters, the basic law will take effect after the US-led coalition hands back sovereignty to a caretaker Iraqi government on June 30.

The basic points in an English-language version of the draft document are:

PREAMBLE - The temporary constitution strives to reclaim the Iraqi people's freedom "which was usurped by the previous tyrannical regime."

ROLE OF ISLAM - Article 7 states: "Islam is the official religion of the state and is to be considered a source of legislation.

"This law shall respect the Islamic identity of the majority of the people of Iraq, but guarantees the complete freedom of all religions and their religious practices."

PRESIDENCY - Iraq will have one president and two vice presidents. The selection of the president depends on whether Iraq becomes a parliamentary or presidential state, which has yet to be decided, a council member said.

FEMALE REPRESENTATION - The representation of women in Iraq's new political bodies is targeted at a minimum of 25 percent.

FEDERAL IRAQ - On a dispute over setting up a federal state, Kurdistan will retain its federal status and the rest of Iraq will be given the right to prepare to form states.

LANGUAGE - Arabic and Kurdish are described as the two official languages, while all other minorities have the right to use their own language in education.

DIRECT ELECTIONS - A body, yet to be decided, will take back sovereignty from the US-led coalition on June 30 and prepare for direct elections for a transitional national assembly "if possible, before December 31, 2004 and, in any case, no later than January 31, 2005."

How this post-June 30 body is chosen will be decided in the next couple of months, taking into account future recommendations by the United Nations, a senior coalition official said.

PERMANENT ASSEMBLY - The transitional national assembly will draw up a permanent constitution by August 15, 2005, which will be put to a national referendum by no later than October 15, 2005.

If this timeframe is maintained, another general election will take place by December 15, 2005.

 

Iraq’s peshmerga ‘break’ Mount Sinjar siege

Yemen’s Huthis seize Sanaa state offices

Tough times for oil-rich GCC

Obama concerned about Egypt mass trials

Tumbling oil prices cut budgets of Mideast arms exporters

EU foreign affairs head to visit Iraq

Turkey court remands Samanyolu TV chief in custody

IS threatens to kill Lebanese soldiers held hostage

Turkish media chiefs charged with terrorism

Iraq may delay payment of Kuwait war reparations

Over $900 million needed to help Syria children

Saudi rules out oil output reduction

Dutch populist lawmaker to be tried for 'fewer Moroccans' vow

Outrage in Algeria over Islamist call for Algerian author's death

Iraq Kurds, coalition launch offensive to retake Sinjar

Three years to end Israeli occupation in UN resolution

Somalia appoints new PM after bitter infighting

Blow to Israel: EU court removes Hamas from terror blacklist

Sharp rise in Syria passport applications

Turkey FM visit to Iran highlights Syria divide

UK troops mistreated Iraq detainees in 2004

Saudi to carry on massive public spending

Iran to Australia: We warned you about the gunman

From bikini to Jihad in Ceuta, Melilla

Tunisia votes Sunday in second round of presidential poll

Islamist militias launch air strike near key Libyan oil terminals

Egypt refers 312 Islamists to military courts

Turkey rejects EU criticism over media arrests

Kerry meets chief Palestinian negotiator

Saudi cleric sparks uproar for showing wife’s face

15,000 march against country’s ‘Islamisation’ in eastern Germany

Key oil producers face uncertain outlook in 2015

Gulf stock markets tumble

Australia mourns Sydney cafe siege victims

Hostages flee as police storm Sydney café

Erdogan to EU: Mind your own business!

Syria PM in Iran for talks with key ally

22 Swiss jihadists fighting abroad

#illridewithyou: Australians stand in solidarity with Muslims

Sydney siege 'lone wolf' or IS-led attack?

EU support UN efforts for Aleppo ceasefire

Saudi policeman killed in Riyadh hostage-taking

Saudi king receives Jordan monarch

Palestinians push UN bid to end Israeli occupation

Hostages held in Sydney cafe, Islamic flag held up